Everything that has a beginning has an end

Posts tagged “Michael Meade

“When a person begins to live with their ‘genius’ they begin to be truly wyyrrdd”*

(*According to Michael Meade, one of the meanings of the welsh Wyyrrdd is to have one foot in both worlds)

“The genius wants activity. It is connected to the stars. It is connected to a spark and it wants to burn and it wants to create and it has gifts to give. You have a name that is inside you and the stars know your name and even if you are lost in this world if you remember your connection to the stars, to the dance of this cosmos, you can find yourself.”

 

Michael Meade is attempting to reintroduce the idea of the ‘genius’ to our contemporary world. Through his organization, the Mozaic Multicultural Foundation, he has started the Genius Project.

Michael Meade –

“We’re in the time of tragic stories. The background for this consideration of genius is really the rattling of culture and the disruption of the world. We don’t just have one problem. We have pretty much every problem we could imagine and we have it all at the same time.”

From the website –

“The context for Mosaic’s Genius Project is our modern world, full of uncertainty, in which we are subject to threats coming from both nature and culture. As climate change and social meltdowns threaten the stability of modern life, we live in a world that borders on chaos.”

“The issue is not whether someone “is a genius,” for genius is a given, something naturally given to each of us as part of the inner project of one’s life. Inner genius is something originally given to each of us in order that we each find a way to give something meaningful and valuable back to the world.”

“Genius has the root meaning of “the spirit that is already there.” As such it points to the inner uniqueness and natural giftedness that enters the world with each person born. When seen as a cohering thread in each life, inner genius serves to weave together a person’s innate talents and abilities while also revealing one’s purpose in life. If people are to find creative ways of living together and healing both culture and nature, the awakening of individual genius may be the deepest and most imaginative way to approach the seemingly impossible tasks that face contemporary cultures.”

 

We are connected to the cosmos, to this world and to each other by the very fact that we are all made of the same star dust. We are also connected to a deep ancestral and mythological lineage that continues to speak to us of the wisdom that lies within. The challenge to stand simultaneously in the world of the imagination as well as the everyday world we live in is great. Mass culture is one of our enemies. As Meade reminds,

 

“One of the problems with mass culture is that it is automatically against the individual. The individual means the undivided person. It means the one who found what was supposed to be found inside them and learned how to live it and therefore they are not divided within themselves. They are not divided from their soul and they are not divided from their own genius, but they are living with it. Mass culture cannot foster that. It cannot support it. It tends to go against it. It is always an upstream swim to become a real person but in a mass culture you are swimming against ocean waves.”

 

The encouragement that Meade offers in the face of this and other challenges is the fact that with the mythology of the genius, each of us is answering a call that came with us into this life we were born into. This calling is a unique answer to the question of ‘what do I have to offer to the world?’ Listen below as he tries to open a window into this idea for each of us to explore.

 

 

 

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The Soul’s High and Low Adventure

I think we’re miserable partly because we have only one god, and that’s economics. Economics is a slave-driver. No one has free time; no one has any leisure. The whole culture is under terrible pressure and fraught with worry. It’s hard to get out of that box. That’s the dominant situation all over the world.”  – James Hillman in response to this question – – – “Goethe…remarked that our greatest happiness lies in practicing a talent that we were meant to use. Are we so miserable, as a culture, because we’re dissociated from our inborn talents, our soul’s code?”

We have a seeded self that begins to germinate at birth. Our true goal in life is to become that self.

There’s an African proverb: “When death finds you, may it find you alive.” Alive means living your own damn life, not the life that your parents wanted, or the life some cultural group or political party wanted, but the life that your own soul wants to live. That’s the way to evaluate whether you are an authentic person or not.

Spirit in mythology and traditional cosmology is connected to fire and air, and it rises. Soul is connected to water and earth, and it descends. When we rise with spirit, we get peak experiences and those overviews of life that include moments of freedom. Soul goes the opposite way. Water runs down. The earth has gravity and pulls us to it. The soul wants us to grow down and become deep like a river. When people talk about “connection,” they’re really talking about soul. The real connections are not surface connections. You can have many friends on Facebook, but your real friends are those who know and support your deep self and will remind you when you’re losing touch with your own soul.

What is often missing in modern mass culture is this depth of connection. When you see a culture dividing into simplistic polarities — which is all of our politics nowadays and most of our religion — what’s going on is a loss of soul. People who are in touch with their soul know what they’re supposed to be doing in the world and what their way of contributing to life is, in the same way that people know what music they love and what food they enjoy — not just life-sustaining food, but food that has flavor, that makes you feel nourished, even inspired.

The U.S. has become mired in spiritual materialism. People are substituting material accomplishments or possessions for the things the soul loves, such as music and meaningful speech. The soul even loves suffering when the suffering produces realization. In a mass effort to find superficial comforts and avoid suffering, the whole culture has lost soul.”  – Michael Meade