Everything that has a beginning has an end

When something takes on a life of its own

(For Marcus)

 

J.F Martel describes in his book Reclaiming Art the experience some may have had in the presence of a created work, be it a piece of music, a film, dance, theater, a painting, a moment in a novel, a poem…

The experience is one where the work actually captures you where the emotional reaction is such that you believe that the world you thought you knew is somehow different now, now that you have crossed paths with this creation. That this work is actually having a conversation with you or perhaps speaking to you, acutely and individually just you. As if it were alive, as if it had meaning that only you could decipher.

Martel suggests that this experience is not necessarily caused by the intention of the creator or performer but that it is something that is breaking through, something that has a living presence. Now he describes this in conjunction with great works of art – he uses a friend’s encounter with a painting by Van Gogh as one example. I’ve had something strange and powerful happen with one of my paintings, the one featured above. In no way do I think it falls into the category of ‘great’ or even very good. I cannot look at it without critically going over everything I think is wrong with it.

Yet a couple of years ago it was in a show at the studio where I take classes regularly. I invited some new friends to attend the opening. After one couple had arrived and had meandered around looking at different paintings I discovered to my amazement that one of them had been so overcome with emotion after standing arrested in front of this piece that tears were flowing down his face. He tried to express what was happening inside to cause such a reaction but could not adequately explain only to say that it felt like the woman in this painting had pierced his heart. As he described it, for him this was a life changing experience. I was incredibly humbled that anyone could feel this from looking at one of my paintings. Later I stood in front of it hoping to get a taste of what he had experienced…Of course nothing happened. It had no effect on me whatsoever. But I looked at it as a gift and a mystery of what could happen from something that I was a part of in creating. To this day I still don’t understand what happened that evening but I accept it as something I was privileged to witness. I’m thankful for that.

There is an old phrase that goes, ‘something that takes on a life of its own.’

As Martel says in his book describing the process, “It is more than a creation: it is a creature.”

 

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4 responses

  1. Don

    I’ve had three experiences like that with paintings by Turner in the National Gallery in London. Those words by Martel are so profoundly true. Marvellous post – thank you.

    Like

    April 9, 2015 at 1:08 pm

    • I’ve never had the privilege of seeing a Turner in person. I envy you that :-). But it is amazing the experience of seeing one of these classic works in the flesh after perusing art books for so long. I know when I have finally encountered something I thought I knew from photos to actually see and feel its power is quite an experience. It truly is like meeting an ancient being landed here from some other world.

      Liked by 3 people

      April 9, 2015 at 11:35 pm

  2. I do so love the idea, and the experience of creatureliness to be encountered everywhere in the worlds we inhabit. Great post!

    Like

    April 29, 2015 at 2:37 pm

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